Two types of archaeological dating


28-Apr-2016 22:15

The first textiles were probably made from intertwined stems and grasses, until a way of twisting short fibres and animal hairs into continuous strands evolved about 10,000 BC.Fragments of cloth dating from between 5,000 BC and 500 AD have been excavated from tombs and monuments in South America, Egypt and China, and these show crude examples of darning, half cross stitch and satin stitch.The Crusaders probably brought home embroidered textiles from the Middle Eastern countries after the Crusades.The well-travelled trade and spice caravan routes carried not only merchants and their stock of articles which were for sale but also itinerant craftsmen, who practised their skills wherever they settled.C They are hand work over the woven threads on clothing.The earliest example of a complete cross stitch is a design worked in upright crosses on linen, and the piece was discovered in a Coptic tomb in Upper Egypt, where it was preserved by the dry desert climate dating from about 500AD in Upper Egypt.The patterns on many Chinese textiles show great similarity to those found on Persian fabrics.The only certainty is that the technique and designs of cross stitch spread from many of these countries throughout the European continent.

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An ancient Peruvian running-stitch sampler has been dated to 200–500 AD The word Embroidery comes from the Anglo-Saxon word for "edge", but the technique itself was being used long before that.It is feasible that techniques and designs spread from China via India and Egypt to the great civilisations of Greece and Rome, and from there throughout the countries of the eastern Mediterranean and the Middle East.



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